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John Thomson Super BIG Photo Gallery for the Worlds and Roubaix

09/25/2021 12:02
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PeloPics: With the World championship road race and Paris-Roubaix in the next week, John Thomson has put together another BIG photo gallery for our pleasure. Belgium and France – Hot beds of cycling, cobbles, fashion and beer, with a bit of Italian Strade Bianche style thrown in.

# You can see more ‘John Thomson Photo Galleries’ HERE. #

John says: “A mixed gallery that includes riders in the news, top stars and with the first Paris Roubaix Femmes coming up, a few ski goggle free shots from Strade Bianche Donne 2018. Paris Fashion Week street style and some scans from my magazine collection round out the gallery.”

 

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A morning shot of the cobbles in Compiègne with the low angle sun

 

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Mathieu van der Poel at Scheldecross Antwerpen 2018 and just off a comeback win at the Antwerp Port Epic. If his back is OK then he will be good to go for the worlds and PRB

 

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Gorgeous Lili Reinhart at Valentino

 

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Tour of Britain winner Wout van Aert getting up a steep climb at Overijse 2016

 

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The Flemish Lion in Compiègne at the start of Paris Roubaix

 

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Belgian fans take their cross very seriously. Wout van Aert at Overijse 2016 and looking good for the worlds and Paris Roubaix

 

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Après Isabel Marant

 

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Former world champions Tatiana Guderzo and Marta Bastianelli at Strade Bianche Donne 2018

 

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Sofia Carson at Valentino

 

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Former world champions Peter Sagan and Philippe Gilbert at Paris Roubaix 2018. Still the last two winners of PRB

 

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Rain at Chanel

 

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From cross to one of the very top sprinters. Tim Merlier at Overijse 2018 and aiming for Paris Roubaix

 

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Xenia Adonts at Valentino

 

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A real Belgian beauty

 

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Multiple South African champion with a degree in Chemical Engineering. Ashleigh Moolman Pasio at Strade Bianche Donne 2018

 

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Sarah Ellen at Louis Vuitton

 

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Janneke Ensing at Strade Bianche Donne 2018 and finished twice in the top ten on the white roads

 

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Leonie Hanne on the cobbles at the Trocadéro

 

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After a tough abandon at the Vuelta, AV is coming back this season and next. Alejandro Valverde the iron man at Strade Bianche 2018

 

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Caroline Vreeland at TommyxZendaya. Her maternal great-grandmother was fashion editor Diana Vreeland

 

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A flopped image printed in a special Paris Roubaix edition of Miroir du cyclisme. Photo credit: Miroir du cyclisme

 

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Fashionable couple après Balmain

 

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I’ve always loved this shot by Aldo Tonnoir of Bernard Hinault as world champion covered in mud and riding to win the 1981 Paris Roubaix. He fell seven times and one time a small dog brought him down. Photo credit: Aldo Tonnoir / Sport 80 / Miroir du cyclisme

 

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Another world champion covered in mud. Peter Sagan at Strade Bianche 2018

 

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“Fou d’amour” actress Diane Rouxel at Celine

 

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The GOAT of women’s cycling, Marianne Vos at Namur 2019 and a top favorite for the worlds and Paris Roubaix Femmes

 

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Debby Ryan at Balmain

 

montreal
Fabio Aru said goodbye at this year’s Vuelta after a great career and Guillaume Boivin is the brand new Canadian champion. Here with Peter Sagan at GP Montreal 2016 in the year after Aru won his Vuelta

 

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Sisters in the rain at Chanel

 

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Sam Bennett at GP Quebec 2015 and will make his come back with Bora

 

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Paloma Penniman at Valentino

 

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No repeat victory this year for Jakob Fuglsang at the Race of the Falling Leaves after his Benelux Tour crash. Here at GP Quebec 2016 and maybe on to Team BikeExchange next year

 

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Joudan Dunn at Isabel Marant

 

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Forza Lampaert fans are always up for Paris Roubaix. Yves Lampaert as Belgian champion here at Strade Bianche 2019

 

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Beatrice Valli at Redemption

 

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Antonio Bevilacqua won the 1951 Paris Roubaix. Photo credit Rene Robert

 

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Beauty at Nina Ricci

 

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Liane Lippert just off her 2nd place at the European Championships and here at Strade Bianche Donne 2018

 

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Fashion show in an underground parking garage in Paris

 

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Giovanni Battaglin poster in Miroir du cyclisme. This year is the 40th anniversary of his Giro-Vuelta double in 1981. Photo credit: Olympia / Miroir du cyclisme

 

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Olivia Culpo in the rain outside the Louvre at Louis Vuitton at Paris Fashion Week

 

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Top talent Ben Tulett at Essen 2018 and riding with Ineos Grenadiers next season

 

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Outside the Chanel show at the Grand Palais after the last show Karl Lagerfeld would ever produce. The tourists in the background enjoying the spectacle that is Paris Fashion Week street style

 

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Pieter Serry at Strade Bianche 2018 and loyal to The Wolfpack for another two years

 

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Top model Kaia Gerber at Stella McCartney

 

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Cecilie Uttrup Ludwig has been in the top ten of all editions of Strade Bianche Donne. Here in 2018

 

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“Diary of a Teenage Girl ” actress Bel Powley at Miu Miu

 

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Winner of Flanders and Roubaix and now with his own clothing brand. Niki Terpstra as Dutch national road champion here at Tour of Flanders 2016

 

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Beautiful black and white at Christian Wijnants

 

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Eddy Merckx in Peugeot black and white at the 1967 Milan-San Remo. Photo credit: Bicisport

 

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Colnago of Eddy Merckx from the 1972 Tour of Flanders at the Tour of Flanders museum

 

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Elsa Hosk at Isabel Marant

 

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His cool greatness overpowers the ski goggles. Fabian Cancellara at the Tour of Flanders 2016

 

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We are all waiting for Paris Roubaix

 

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The great Dag Otto Lauritzen at the start of the 2017 Paris Roubaix and now a tv personality

 

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Chantal van den Broek-Blaak as world champion at Strade Bianche Donne 2018 would love to win the first Paris Roubaix Femmes

 

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Gorgeous neon at Paco Rabanne

 

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Thankfully no cardboard signs for Marc Soler at Paris Roubaix 2018, and off to ride with Tadej next year

 

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Stopping Trocadéro traffic

 

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Back when Cycling Weekly was 80 damn pages! The shot of Tom Boonen (with a broken heart on the helmet) by the legendary Phil O’Connor is photo perfection. Also in 2005 you could learn how to train like Lance

 

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Denim influencers at the Grand Palais

 

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Double page poster of Felice Gimondi winning Paris Roubaix 1966 and a very close shot from the back of a moto. Photo credit: Miroir du cyclisme

 

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Beauty at Palais de Tokyo

 

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Multi talented Iljo Keisse at the finish of Paris Roubaix 2018

 

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Mark Spitz on the back cover of L’Equipe Cyclisme Special Tour edition in 1973, a year after the Munich Olympics. A legend to a kid in a swim club in Canada in the 70’s

 

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A great stache at Paco Rabanne

 

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Jonas Van Genechten at the finish of Paris Roubaix is now retired from a career of more than a decade

 

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Winnie Harlow at TommyXZandaya

 

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Kasia Niewiadoma is among the favorites for the end of season races. Here at Strade Bianche Donne 2018

 

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Coca-Cola soldier

 

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Taylor Phinney at Scheldeprijs 2018. Four days later he would be top ten at Paris Roubaix

 

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Charles Crupelandt won Paris Roubaix in 1912 and 1914 and in pre lycra days he was not afraid of showing what he was made of. Photo credit: Miroir du cyclisme

 

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Marlboro Reds at Celine. And no smoking at the worlds in Belgium

 

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Five time Tour de France winner Jacques Anquetil rockin’ a Gauloises. Kids, don’t start smoking! Photo credit: Miroir du cyclisme

 

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Mary Leest at Redemption

 

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Tom Boonen riding his last Tour of Flanders in 2017 with top photog James Startt in the grass getting a low-angle shot

 

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Tom didn’t have the best seats at the velodrome to watch his final Paris Roubaix in 2017

 

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Morgane Polanski arrives at Miu Miu. Her Father directed the greatest neo-noir film, “Chinatown”

 

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Stijn Vandenbergh finishes Paris Roubaix 2017 with a big blister

 

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All white arrival at Paris Fashion Week

 

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Current world champion Julian Alaphilippe before superstardom at GP Montreal 2015

 

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Gorgeous fashion at Palais de Tokyo

 

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Ellen van Dijk at Strade Bianche Donne 2018 and just off her brilliant victory at the European Championships in Italy

 

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Editor-in-Chief of U.S. Vogue Anna Wintour at Valentino

 

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One of the all time great Australian cyclists Amanda Spratt at Strade Bianche Donne 2018

 

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Lace up transparent boots at Maison Margiela

 

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Michael Mørkøv at Tour of Flanders 2017. Ed has a great interview with the star

 

miu miu
I’m more Bergman, Fellini, Fassbinder or Buñuel. But if you watched “Game of Thrones” then you will recognize Brienne of Tarth, Gwendoline Christie at Miu Miu

 

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Koen de Kort was planning to ride a 14th and final Paris Roubaix but is looking to new horizons after his accident

 

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Gorgeous in simple black after the show

 

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Elisa Longo Borghini at Strade Bianche Donne 2018 has had a great season and will ride the worlds as a rouleur for the Italian team

 

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Faux fur coat, shiny red pants and cycling glasses at Celine

 

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The fans choking on the Paris Roubaix dust

 

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Moto pilot after the race

 

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Nils Politt at the finish of Paris Roubaix 2017 and would finish 2nd two years later

 

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Louis Vuitton fans outside the Louvre

 

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Current world champion Anna van der Breggen riding to one of her many great wins, here at Strade Bianche Donne 2018

 

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Landiana Cerciu at Chanel

 

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Anna van der Breggen had an epic win here at Tour of Flanders 2018. And now calling time on a great career after the worlds

 

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Arrival at Balmain

 

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Former world champion Annemiek van Vleuten winning at Strade Bianche Donne 2018 and always a favorite for the worlds

 

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Model after the Paco Rabanne show

 

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Damien Gaudin here at Paris Roubaix 2018 won the 2007 Paris Roubaix Espoirs and the 2017 Tro-Bro Léon

 

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Jasmine Sanders at TommyxZendaya

 

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Ryan Mullen as Irish champion at the start of Tour of Flanders 2018 and on to Bora next year to join another Irishman

 

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Jessica Kahawaty at Valentino

 

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No worlds for Greg van Avermaet, here at Paris Roubaix 2019. But struggles with his health have him aiming for a good PRB

 

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Awesome models posing after the show

 

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Peter Sagan as Slovakian champion at Paris Roubaix 2019 and looking towards end of season form

 

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Arrival at Balmain

 

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2015 Paris Roubaix winner John Degenkolb at the finish in 2017 with his forearm scars and finger injury from the 2016 accident. The champ will ride for Team DSM next year

 

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Chloë Moretz at Louis Vuitton

 

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Eddy Merckx riding to win Paris Roubaix 1973. Photo credit: L’Équipe

 

terpstra
Niki Terpstra had his last win at Tour of Flanders 2018 and maybe or maybe not riding with Sagan next year. But the fans will be back in Flanders for the worlds !!

 

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Beautiful Bruges

 

# Stay PEZ for the World champs and Paris-Roubaix. Thanks to John for another great gallery. #

 

The post John Thomson Super BIG Photo Gallery for the Worlds and Roubaix appeared first on PezCycling News.


Categories:PezCycling News

WORLDS’21: Where is the Smart Money Going?

09/25/2021 0:02
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Worlds Road Race Preview: The World championship road race is one of the hardest races to predict, and this year is even more difficult due to the course and the amount of top men on the start line in Antwerp. The bookmakers have their ideas who will cross the line first in Leuven. Spencer Martin takes a closer look at the odds.

– This article is an excerpt from the Beyond the Peloton newsletter. Sign up here for full access. –

The Men’s World Road Race Championship is taking place this coming Sunday in Flanders, Belgium. The confluence of an interesting course featuring seemingly endless mild climbs and a collection of the world’s best riders shuffled somewhat randomly from their usual trade squads to their national teams. This means that while some stars may be teammates for the day (i.e. Evenepoel & Van Aert), potential alliances is incredibly tenuous and can crumble spectacularly at any moment (i.e. Alejandro Valverde working against his own Spanish teammate Joaquim Rodríguez to help his trade teammate Rui Costa win the race).

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Podium tears from Joaquim Rodriguez in 2013

Adding to the intrigue is that the course, which tracks over two main circuits in the Flanders region of Belgium, is just difficult enough to keep things interesting, but not so difficult as to limit the number of potential winners. On a course like this, the riders will dictate how selective the racing is, but with so much left up to desperate national teams instead of highly focused trade teams, nothing is certain.

With so many potential winners on the start-line, predicting a winner is incredibly difficult, and potentially, a fool’s errand. However, let’s pull back and take a look at the current betting odds and course in an attempt to narrow things down and make sense of what is so often a completely senseless race.

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Those climbs should select the best

Current Betting Odds on BET MGM:
Wout van Aert +190
Mathieu van der Poel +650
Sonny Colbrelli +1000
Julian Alaphilippe +1200
Remco Evenepoel +1800
Kasper Asgreen +1800
Matej Mohorič +2000
Magnus Cort +2000
Primož Roglič +2500
Tom Pidcock +2500
Michael Valgren +2500
Tadej Pogačar +2500
Peter Sagan +3300
Mads Pedersen +3300
Marc Hirschi +3300
Michael Matthews +3300
Matteo Trentin +5000
Jasper Stuyven +5000
Caleb Ewan +5000
Gianni Moscon +6600
Florian Sénéchal +6600

worlds21mtt
Not another second place for Wout Van Aert?

So, Who Will Win?
The million-dollar question is who from this list is actually going to win this thing. The first thing we should touch on is that the World Championships is an incredibly difficult race to predict. The lack of trade teams, misaligned incentives within national teams, one-off courses, and the presence of all of the world’s best riders combine to make it a complete crapshoot. In short, nobody has any idea how this race will play out and the best idea is to not bet on anyone.

Course Profile
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One of the reasons it is so difficult to predict the World Championships is the course, which is almost always a one-off course drawn up by the event’s host. This means that all of the predictions that the course suits ‘X’ but doesn’t suit ‘Y’ are really just somewhat random guesses.

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This year’s race will take place over a hill-packed 268-kilometers between Antwerp and Leuven. After a flat few opening kilometers, the course consists of two circuits completed twice. There is the 15km-long Leuven circuit, and the 32km-long Flandrien-circuit, which includes six climbs. The 550-meter-long Moskestraat cobbled climb which averages 8.9% and peaks out at 17%, is the toughest of the bunch and will be key if teams want to burn off fastmen like Caleb Ewan.

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Can Caleb Ewan hang on for a sprint?

We’ve seen many examples of one-off courses being much more, or less, difficult than predictions. And this makes complete sense. After all, all we get are vague profiles/maps, and anecdotes from people who have previously ridden the course about how difficult it will be. While it can be extremely natural to ride a course and report to the world that it is a brutal course that will certainly break up the bunch, it is an incredibly poor way to predict how a professional peloton, packed up with the best riders in the world, will react to a course. People almost always underestimate just how fit and fast the top riders are, and just how extremely difficult a course has to be to break up a group. For example, the Bergen, Norway course in 2017 featured repeated laps of an extremely hilly circuit but came down to a 26-rider bunch sprint.

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No repeat of 2002 – Cipollini in Zolder

But, at the same time, they can also completely underestimate the effect of variables like crosswinds, the width of the roads, pinch points prior to mid-race climbs, and undulating and twisty roads in the final 20-kilometers that can favor a small group or lone rider against a chasing peloton.

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Too twisty and undulating for Belgian echelons

Having said that, my prediction is that this course might actually end up being harder than expected. In isolation, none of the climbs featured are significant, but the sheer number and successive nature make them incredibly difficult in aggregate. I’ve seen predictions that this will come down to a sprint and that Caleb Ewan could even be present at the finish, but in my opinion, these pundits are forgetting just how selective world championships races can be, and how much more racing is without the presence of powerful trade teams. Additionally, the presence of a few strong teams like Denmark, France, Italy, Holland, Belgium, and France means there should be plenty of firepower to set a difficult pace that will whittle the race down for these country’s leaders, who will benefit from a more selective race.

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Belgium’s race to lose

BTP Favorites In Order of Likelihood to win:
Wout van Aert +190

Judging by his performances in the past few weeks (exhibit A & B), Van Aert is on great form and this course has almost been perfectly constructed for him. This will likely come down to a small sprint on a slight uphill finish, which will benefit a rider who can climb, time trial, and sprint at a world-class level. The only downside is the poor track record of odds-on favorites at World Championship races and his incredibly steep odds. +190 odds would be decent for a hands down grand tour favorite but is horrible for a one-off world championship road race.

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Top favorite – Wout

Mathieu van der Poel +650
Van der Poel’s health has been in question since his crash at the Olympic mountain bike race, but, he has looked quite good in recent races and will line up as one of the most talented riders in the world on a course that suits him incredibly well. And his +650 odds offer a great value.

olympics
Has MvdP recovered?

Kasper Asgreen +1800
The winner of this year’s Tour of Flanders, which is an incredibly similar race to Sunday’s world championship, is in fantastic shape and proved this spring he can win from solo moves or reduced bunch sprints.

asgreen
Asgreen is in fantastic shape

Julian Alaphilippe +1200
The course suits the defending champion incredibly well and he has appeared fit in recent races. But, my big knock on Alaphilippe is that he hasn’t been winning at a high rate in reduced sprints against the likes of Van der Poel and Van Aert over the past two seasons. For him to defend his rainbow jersey, it seems he would have to win from a solo move, which is how he won in 2020. Unfortunately for him, the likelihood of two consecutive solo victories is infinitesimally small compared to winning from a reduced sprint.

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Repeat Alaphilippe?

Magnus Cort +2000
The toast of the recent Vuelta a Espana (wins on stage 6 & stage 19) is clearly in top form and has proven he is comfortable racing for the win on anything from a solo move to a bunch sprint. He will also be helped by the presence of an absurdly strong Danish team. One major red flag for Cort is that despite having 21 career victories, only one is from a one-day race (the 2017 Clasica de Almeria), but at +2000, he could be worth a small bet.

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Cort has been good in 2021

Sonny Colbrelli +1000
The Italian boasts great form, a strong team, and a recent run of impressive wins. But, as we saw at the recent Tour de France, while his brute strength is more than enough to get him to the finish at worlds, his top-end sprint speed has diminished to a point that it will be difficult for him to prevail over truly world-class riders. And with +1000 odds, he isn’t exactly a steal.

pantani
Euro champ to World champ

Remco Evenepoel +1800
As evidenced by his third place in the time trial, the young Belgian is one of the best solo riders in the world. However, the solo win is the only winning move in his playbook, and this is incredibly difficult to execute against the best competition, which is why the biggest win on his palmarès is the 2019 San Sebastián race. Having said that, Evenepoel is strong and talented enough to pull it off on Sunday and will be able to use the fact that not many will be lining up to chase him down only to pull his teammate Van Aert to the finish line.

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The young gun – Remco

Matej Mohorič +2500
The Slovenian was the solo-win king of the recent Tour de France (stages 7 & 19) and showed at the Benelux Tour that he is in great shape. One major obstacle facing Mohorič is that the course is likely not difficult enough for him to wedge open an advantage. But, like Evenepoel, he could potentially exploit the massive attention that will be paid to the major favorites and the unwillingness for others to chase down late-race attacks if Van der Poel and Van Aert are present.

Matej Mohorič
Mohorič – Possible

Outside Picks:
Marc Hirschi +3300
Gianni Moscon +6600
Florian Sénéchal +6600
Quinn Simmons (Not currently offered)

Hirschi Bauke Mollema
Hirschi has been looking good recently

Hirschi, Moscon, Sénéchal, and Simmons have all displayed great fitness recently and are strong enough to force their way into a late-race move and fast enough to win from a reduced sprint. While outsiders rarely win at worlds, any of these riders are strong enough to exploit a breakdown in tactics from the major teams and favorites like we saw at the 2019 edition.

Stay Away From:
Tadej Pogačar +3300
Michael Matthews +3300
Primož Roglič +2500
Tom Pidcock +25000
Matteo Trentin +5000

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Pogačar or Roglič – One or other, or neither

Pogačar and Roglič have won major races this season, but as we saw in the time trial and European road race championships, Pogačar isn’t back to his best after his post-Tour break. Roglič won the recent Vuelta a Espana in absolutely dominant fashion, but I worry about the Slovenian’s lack of top-level bike handling on such a technical and intense one-day race.

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Too many parties after the Olympics?

Pidcock has looked great at times this season and won De Brabantse Pijl earlier this season, which includes some of the same roads at this world championships. But, he is clearly lacking form due to switching his focus to mountain biking in the build-up to the Olympics (where he won gold), and only has a single pro road win in his career. Also, a 268-kilometer race is likely too long for a WorldTour rookie.

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Matthews and Trentin….

Matthews and Trentin are extremely overpriced at their current odds. They have won two races between them over the last two seasons and both have fallen into a valley where they are not strong enough to climb with less-quick finishers and not fast enough to out-sprint quicker riders in even the most reduced bunch sprints.


Who will be first in Leuven?


# Spencer Martin is the author of the cycling-analysis newsletter Beyond the Peloton that breaks down the nuances of each race and answers big picture questions surrounding team and rider performance. Sign up now to get full access to all the available content and race breakdowns. #

The post WORLDS’21: Where is the Smart Money Going? appeared first on PezCycling News.


Categories:PezCycling News

WORLDS’21 PREVIEW: PEZ Picks the SUPER Faves

09/25/2021 0:02
worlds20

Worlds Road Race Preview: The biggest one-day race on the calendar, the World Championships are in Flanders this Sunday and the Men’s Elite Road Race has one of the strongest fields on a tough course of Flemish ramps. Ed Hood gives us his thought on the ‘Rainbow Race’.

worlds20 alaphilippe
Alaphilippe again?

The official website tells us:
After the start on the Grote Markt in Antwerp, the peloton leaves for Leuven, with a passage in Official Village Keerbergen. Arriving in Leuven, the final unfolds on the local circuit (4 hills) and the Flandrien circuit (6 hills):
1.5 x local circuit Leuven,
1 x Flandrien circuit
4 x local circuit Leuven,
1 x Flandrien circuit
2.5 x local circuit Leuven.
The finish line after this tough race is on the sloping Geldenaaksevest.
Elevation: 2,562m
Distance: 268.30km

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Got that? Me neither but in a word, CHALLENGING with some 40 climbs – and the TV producer will keep us right, we hope.

But down to business, who’s gonna do the BUSINESS?

We thought we’d wander through the start sheet by nation. . .

Australia: has won the race once in the past thanks to Cadel Evans, this year they have to look to Michael Matthews, he’s twice stood on the Elite podium with bronze in Bergen 2017 and Richmond silver in 2015. He’s perhaps not as ultimately quick as he was but after a tough race like this one is going to be we can see him there or thereabouts – but not as a winner.

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Matthews – Maybe not

Belgium: is ‘Record Nation’ for the Professional/Elite Worlds with 26 wins, most recently with Philippe Gilbert in 2012. The parcours is made for a home, ‘Classicer’, BUT who? Wout Van Aert is one of our four ‘super favourites’ – with his silver medal in the Worlds Time Trial doing nothing to diminish that status – not forgetting his dominant Tour of Britain but Belgium’s perennial problem can be summed up in one word; ‘unity’.

Wonder Boy and TT bronze medalist, Remco Evenepoel will strongly fancy his own chances and Jasper Stuyven didn’t win the Primavera because he’s not got a race like this in his legs. I’d love to be at the pre-race team briefing and study the facial expressions. And if you hear a journalist ask a rider if he’ll ride for so-and-so team mate and he replies; ‘the road will decide.’ That means; ‘No!’

olympics
It has to be Wout – Or does it?

Denmark: has won the race but once, thanks to Mads Pedersen on a truly horrible day in Harrogate, England in 2019. And they have the same problem as Belgium, who’s the ‘Capo’? Pedersen can’t be ruled out; Magnus Cort is on fire – see the Vuelta stage results, Michael Valgren is back from the dead with back to back Italian semi-classic wins whilst E3 and Ronde winner Kasper Asgreen is a beast of a man. The Danish mentality is different to that of the Belgians and they should work as a team, but. . .

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Magnus Cort is part of a strong Danish team

France: is third in the nations ranking of Worlds wins on nine with cavalier defending champion, Julian Alaphilippe unlikely to surrender that maillot easily; he won the Flèche and was second at Liege so the repeated sharp climbs will hold few fears for him. However, should he stumble and over stretch himself then France’s ‘coming man’ is ‘Clark Kent doppelganger’, winning Plouay and Jura winner in recent weeks, Benoit Cosnefroy.

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Alaphilippe suited the rainbow hoops

GB: has won this race twice thanks to the late, great Tom Simpson and the publicity magnet that is Mark Cavendish in Copenhagen in 2011. Cav rides again as part of a strong British team but will be in a team role on this parcours; small but sensational Olympic Mountain Bike Champion, Fleche Brabançonne winner and Amstel runner-up, Tom Pidcock looks to be their man. But will he be tired from his first Grand Tour in Spain or will that special physiology of his have ‘super compensated’ and he’ll fly? We’ll know on Sunday.

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Tom Pidcock – Maybe peaked for the Olympics

Germany: has also twice won the Worlds but you have to go all the way back to 1966 and the late Rudi Altig to find the last time they won. Max Schachmann is quality but their ‘Man’ is more likely to be big, recent Tour of Germany winner, Nils Politt who has stepped up a level this year and whose attacking style will be suited to the spikey profile.

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Nils Politt could be ‘the man’

Italy: is second in the list of winners with 19 but Alessandro Ballan’s 2008 is slipping further and further away. However in Sonny Colbrelli we have our second, ‘super favourite’. I remember being at the Worlds in 2014 and Colbrelli was touted as a favourite but he lived up to his reputation of flopping on the big day. This year he’s different, he’s found that, ‘big ride temperament’ with Italian and European titles to his name. Caveats? That could be Matteo Trentin, devastated Worlds silver medallist in 2019 – however, the Squadra Azzuri generally rides as a cohesive unit, national pride does matter to the Italians.

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Colbrelli – Italian ‘super favourite’

The Netherlands: is fourth in the rankings with seven wins but it’s a long way back to ’85 and Joop Zoetemelk stealing away solo almost within sight of the line. This team does, however contain our third, ‘super favourite’ in the shape of tall and versatile Mathieu van der Poel, we thought that his hard landing in the Olympic Mountain Bike Race was the end of his season. However, the recent Antwerp Port Epic debunked that theory as the big Cyclo-cross World Champion looked to be back to near his best. Just remember to eat this time, Mathieu – not like at Harrogate ’19. . .

tdf21st8
MvdP – Is his back up to it?

Portugal: has won the race with Rui Costa in 2013; a race still the subject of bar room debate – did Valverde stab compatriot Rodriguez in the back that day in Florence? João Almeida has to be considered on Sunday – he’s been strong all year with his dominant GC win in Poland the high point.

giro21st19
João Almeida – Strong all year

Slovakia: has won this race three times on the bounce thanks to a certain Peter Sagan – and he’s back for 2021. His season was compromised by his crash in the Tour de France but two second places in Slovakia and the overall win recently, mean that you dismiss his chances at your peril.

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Peter Sagan – World champion No.4?

Slovenia: has never won the race with Andrej Hauptmann’s 2001 bronze as close as they’ve come. However, that could change as we nominate our fourth and final, ‘super favourite’ in the tall, lean shape of Tour de France winner, Tadej Pogačar.

But there’s more!

This nation of just 2.1 million souls also fields another two men who it come as no surprise if they won, Vuelta winner, Primoz Roglič and double Tour stage winner, Matej Mohorič who could become the first man to win the junior, u23 and elite world titles. And they don’t just have three of the race favourites, they have strong back up in the shape of men like Jan Tratnik and Luka Mezgec.

tdf21st1
Pogačar and Roglič – Which?

Spain: has won the race on six occasions with ever green Alejandro Valverde defying Old Father just three years ago. The ‘Green Bullet’ doesn’t ride this year due to a broken collar bone and as far as Spain’s chances go, like the record company A&R men say; ‘I don’t hear a single’ but one for the future is INEOS’ Tour de l’Avenir winner, Carlos Rodriguez, we like the cut of his jib.

sabatini
Carlos Rodriguez – We like the cut of his jib

Switzerland: has won the race three times, most recently in the shape of Oscar Camenzind in 1998. But in Marc Hirschi they have a man whose form is coming to the boil at just the right time – and don’t forget that he was third last year. And on the subject of Worlds bronze, European iTT Champion, Stefan Küng was third in the 2019 Harrogate horror.

Hirschi Bauke Mollema
Hirschi – Coming into form

United States: Greg Lemond and Big Tex have given the USA three wins in the race and Olympic Road Race hero, Brandon McNulty is a man who should be in the mix.

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McNulty for USA

One name?

Wout.

# ‘Worlds Race Report’ on Sunday and all the news in ‘EUROTRASH’ and the ‘BREAKDOWN’ on Monday. For live action go to SteepHillTV. #

The post WORLDS’21 PREVIEW: PEZ Picks the SUPER Faves appeared first on PezCycling News.


Categories:PezCycling News

Gear Break: BASSO Bikes, Limar New Air Stratos, Kuat Rack, BlackHeart Bike, SockGuy, & Strava

09/24/2021 12:02

Gear Break: BASSO Bikes use motorcycle crates for fast gravel bikes, discover the new Limar Air Stratos, Kuat releases the all-new Piston™ Pro X hitch rack, BlackHeart Bike Company has launched a new aluminum version of its titanium Allroad frameset, spooky SockGuy socks for Halloween and you can now add gear to your Strava profile.


BASSO Bikes: #wedopalta …Again

basso

As you might have already seen should you live near one of our top dealers, there is news brewing here at BASSO HQ. The next generation of gravel is on the way and the wooden crates placed around the world at our top dealerships serve as a bit of foreshadowing for what is to come. Motorcycle crates for fast gravel bikes seemed to be a coherent means of shipping as well as communication.

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  • More information: palta.bassobikes.com

  • Discover the New Limar Air Stratos

    limar

    The new LIMAR AIR STRATOS has arrived.
    Discover it in all its multi features
    Ideal for the gravel world and bike-packing, but perfect also on road

    limar

    AIR STRATOS is a high performance all-terrain helmet for fast, light gravel and adventure riding. This robust and lightweight model has been designed from the ground up to keep the weight low and the comfort high.

    limar

    With a strong and resistant structure, designed to run freely for thousands of kilometers, Air Stratos is particularly suitable for the gravel world and for bike-packing expeditions, so to travel anywhere.

    limar

    Air Stratos is the perfect combination of strength and lightness: very light helmet, with a well distributed weight, in size M only 240 gr, for an absolute comfort. Available in two sizes and seven colors.

    limar

    Ready for the perfect mix of racing and adventure? With Air Stratos you can live your adventures everywhere, surrounded by wonderful scenery, riding on your bike with style, fun and in total safety!

    limar

    Technical Features:

  • Technology: Double in mould pc-eps shell
  • Air Vents: 15 air vents, inner air flow channels
  • Sizing System: AirFit-System with height adjustment and webbing connection
  • Pads: Antibacterial and washable comfort pads
  • Fit: Comfort
  • Size (CM): M (53-57) – L (57-61)
  • Weight (G): M 240 – L 250
  • More info at: https://limar.com/air-stratos/

  • Kuat Releases the All-New Piston™ Pro X
    In 2008, we set out to rethink the hitch rack from the ground up. We tinkered, we engineered, and we evolved. Our latest creation is the most advanced and easy to use rack we have made.

    Meet Piston™ Pro X
    When we started creating Piston™ Pro X, we took our design successes, and failures, and set out to improve on all of them. We knew we wanted one hand, one-tap pneumatic operation with zero contact on the bike frame. We wanted LED taillights and simple, tool-free adjustable tire chock slides for all bikes sizes and tires. Finally, we wanted the most durable materials and coatings. All things we knew we wanted in a rack, but had never seen together in one. And, after years of hard work, we are more than a little excited to share this revolutionary rack with you.

    kuat

    Key features of Piston™ Pro X:

  • All aluminum construction with a steel hitch
  • It’s burly and designed to stay that way. Our all-metal construction and ten-year, no-fade Tiger Powder coat, means it will look great for the long haul.

  • Dual Genuine Kashima Coat hydro-pneumatic tire arms
  • Our exclusive partnership with Genuine Kashima Coat brings the most advanced coating on the planet where you need it. One simple tap and the hydro-pneumatic arms open wide, then you just ratchet them in to fit on your bike tire perfectly—no contact with the frame. Beautiful and amazingly durable, it makes bells and whistles jealous.

    kuat

  • Integrated LED taillights with magnetic quick-connect plug-in cable
  • Perhaps our brightest idea yet. Folded or flat, these integrated LED lights make sure your beautiful ride doesn’t block the taillights on your rig. Attaching is über simple with a magnetic plug that fits right into your trailer light connection.

  • One-handed FastFit™ tool free tire chock slides
  • Whether you are rolling on smallish wheels or beefy tires, you won’t need any adapters or tools to make them fit. Just squeeze and slide to adjust the arms to hold 18”-29” tires up to 5” wide up to a 53” wheelbase.

    kuat

  • Flatlock™ hitch cam with lockable, tamper resistant install tool
  • No more wondering where you put that tool you need to make your rack wobble free. It’s right where you need it when you need it, held in place magnetically. Plus, you can lock it up for added security.

  • Hitch lock and semi-integrated cable lock
  • The hitch lock keeps the rack secured so no one can slide it out when you are not looking, and the semi-integrated 12mm cable lock makes sure your bike stays locked up tight on while looking tight. Our FlatLock™ hitch cam is also a security tool for double safety.

    kuat

  • QuickConnect™ Add-ons
  • When you have more than two bikes, quickly add one or two additional riders with our QuickConnect™ one bike or two bike add-on. The modular design makes attaching the additional trays super simple and the end pull handle makes pivoting the rack up or down convenient. Even easier than that? The lights automatically connect.

  • Optional eBike Ramp and selective bike unloading
  • Easily load and unload heavier cruisers and e-bikes with the optional eBike ramp and save the grunt work for the ride. AND, no need to take off the front bikes to get to the back one. Piston™ Pro X makes selective bike unloading a simple option.

    kuat

    All of these features and so much more. Piston™ Pro X from Küat.
    The hitch rack, evolved.

  • More info at: https://www.kuat.com

  • BlackHeart Bike Company, Based in Venice Beach, CA, has Launched a New Aluminum Version of its Flagship Titanium Allroad Frameset

    blackheart

    Overview
    First launched in January 2020, the titanium allroad bike is known for its telepathic handling and lively ride on road, and its playful and confident handling off road.

    The aluminum version has the exact same design, geometry, and features – but is half the price.

    blackheart

    We believe this bike is perfect for the majority of cycling enthusiasts who love to ride road and gravel – but don’t care about marginal aero gains of aero road bikes, don’t need the full capability of gravel-specific bikes, and can’t justify owning two bikes.

    It’s one bike that looks and handles like a road bike while having the capability for most gravel adventures.

    blackheart

    Main Talking Points

  • Break the mold – Ride aluminum
  • Durable, Double-butted aluminum frame that won’t let you down in a crash
  • Oversized main triangle for sharp, confident handling
  • Thin seat stays and carbon seatpost for a compliant ride
  • Same carbon fork as the Ti bike
  • $1375 frameset is half the price of the $2750 titanium frameset
  • $2900 105/Ultegra RX build
  • $3400 Rival eTap AXS build with upgraded Hunt alloy wheels
  • Custom fork paint will continue to be an option for $200-$300 depending on design and number of colors
  • blackheart

    Sales

  • Framesets and builds begin delivery in February 2022
  • Available DTC on BlackHeart website and through select dealer network
  • Pre-orders available now at blackheartbikeco.com

  • Spooky SockGuy Socks for Halloween

    sockguy

    Bring out the fright this Halloween with these high performance crew socks featuring a neon yellow cat on one side and a neon yellow ghost and tombstone on the other. All this on signature black and purple stripes.

    Product Features:

  • Ultra-wicking acrylic base with superior softness and stretch to eliminate hot spots and blisters.
  • Mesh upper for ultimate airflow.
  • Exclusive Easy-Fit cuff never falls down.
  • Unique Stretch-to-Fit sizing system for a perfect fit on a wide range of foot sizes.
  • Double-stitched nylon heel & toe for durability and longevity.
  • Off-beat, original designs only SockGuy can provide!
  • sockguy

  • See the full SockGuy Halloween collection at: www.sockguy.com

  • Add Gear to Your Strava Profile

    strava

    Strava have announced an update that will give athletes the ability to add gear to their profiles via the mobile app, specifically shoes and bikes. This update brings a long-requested web feature to mobile, creating parity between surfaces.

    More information on what’s new:

  • For runners, walkers, hikers, it’s not always common knowledge among new/experiential runners that shoes have a shelf life. Cushioning, shock absorption and stability decrease over time and can cause unnecessary aches and pains or even injury.
  • For cyclists, Mileage can be useful to track, helping to plan upgrade/maintenance schedules, or just for reflection, to influence future purchases.
  • This brings a web-only feature to mobile, creating parity between surfaces.
  • How to Access Feature:
    Profile > Gear > Add

  • More info at: www.strava.com.

  • Note: PEZCyclingNews ask that you contact the manufacturers before using any products you see here. Only the manufacturer can provide accurate and complete information on proper / safe use, handling, maintenance and or installation of products as well as any conditional information or product limitations.

    The post Gear Break: BASSO Bikes, Limar New Air Stratos, Kuat Rack, BlackHeart Bike, SockGuy, & Strava appeared first on PezCycling News.

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    Categories:PezCycling News

    Eamon [van] Lucas Talks Belgium!

    09/24/2021 0:02
    lucas

    Rider Interview: The biggest race in the World is this Sunday in Belgium, to be exact; Flanders. Californian, Eamon [van] Lucas is based in Brugge and rides (and wins) kermis races, the backbone of the Belgian cycling scene. Ed Hood caught up with Eamon to talk of the ‘Heartland’ of cycle-sport.

    lucas
    Happy surfer

    What do the sun kissed shores of Monterey, California and the rain slicked cobbles of Flanders have in common? That’s easy; Eamon [van] Lucas, surfer and Brugge-based kermis killer. In 2019 he was burning up the kermises with wins in Maldegem-Kleit, Izegem, Oostrozebeke, Osstkamp, Langemark, Marke and Eermegem but last year was a Covid wash out and this year didn’t start for amateurs in Belgium until July. And whilst it’s plain ‘Eamon Lucas’ on the beach, there’s a ‘van’ in the middle when he’s in Flanders; “all those Flemish dudes are called ‘van something’ so I figured I should be a ‘van’ too!” We last spoke to him back in April so thought it was time we got his latest take from deep in the Heartland.

    PEZ: How do marriage and the Flatlands mix, Eamon?
    Eamon Lucas:
    It’s a good life man, you have to give and take, good communication is important and she’s taking to life in Flanders; learning the language, teaching English, doing her writing. . .

    lucas
    Win for Shifting Gears

    PEZ: How has the season gone for your Shifting Gears team?
    We’ve had a pretty good year, around 10 wins and another 10/15 podium finishes. There’ll be the usual comings and goings from the team over the winter but there’s a ride for me with the team in 2022 if I want it.

    frit
    Kermis frites

    PEZ: How’s the kermis scene?
    It’s never been stronger, in my experience. Back in 2019 race average speeds were in the 44/45 kph range but every race is faster than that now – the race I rode the other day we did 51 kph for the first hour, crazy! And the fans are still turning out in their numbers, hanging over the barriers, drinking pils, eating frites and betting on the races.

    belgian betting
    On course betting

    PEZ: How have the results gone for you?
    Let’s say that I’m satisfied with how my season has gone, I’ve had three third places, one second place, a win and another six or seven top 10 finishes plus maybe 24/25 races in total where I’ve been in the top half of the field.

    PEZ: Is there a stand-out result for you this year?
    The thing I’m most pleased with this year is my consistency, there was no one single race with a ‘wow factor’ but this year I’ve always gone well, in 2019 I was either winning or nowhere. And I’ve learned to race smarter than I used to.

    lucas
    Win in Oudenburg 2021

    PEZ: How goes the quest for a pro contract?
    I have two possibilities, one at Continental level and one at ProTeam; I don’t have an agent as such so I do a lot of the spade work myself but I have guys who help me with contacts and the like.

    PEZ: I noticed on social media that you’ve been scaling some of those big passes in la Bella Italia?
    Yeah, that was during our training camp at Livigno, I have a coaching business and one of my clients organised training in Majorca with me as his, ‘live in’ coach and he also organised an altitude camp in Italy for us. We did the Gavia, Stelvio, Motorilo, Forcola. . . But I have to tell you, climbing those mountain passes ain’t easy!

    lucas
    2nd in Izegem Bellevue 2021

    PEZ: When do you call, ‘time’ on season 2021?
    I head back on October 1st so have a couple more weeks, when I get back to the States I ride the Sea Otter circuit race at Laguna Seca near my home town of Monterey, I won it in 2017 and would like to be up there again. It’s usually much earlier in the year but has been put back due to the situation with the virus.

    PEZ: Will the off season involve surfing?
    For sure, I can’t wait, my birthday comes in the middle of my off season and we always arrange a surfing trip to coincide with it. When you’ve not seen your friends for six or nine months it’s cool to get reacquainted and there’s a usually an Indian Summer so the weather is good. We may go to Pebble Beach, Lovers Point or Santa Cruz – and there are good surfing beaches all along Big Sur.

    lucas
    3rd in Marke 2021

    PEZ: And your coaching gig keeps you busy over the winter?
    Yes, my clients aren’t racing but the winter is when you make gains for season 2022 – base miles, gym work, core. I have a lot of masters clients and their big goal is the Masters Worlds in October. It’s impressive how serious some of those guys are; one of my clients is a surgeon, he’ll put in a 12/13 hour day but still do his work out after it.

    PEZ: Did you ever consider a pro career in the USA?
    Before I came to Europe I raced that scene and won races, I daresay I could get a contract and go back to it but I just think that I have bigger fish to fry.

    lucas
    Bring on 2022

    PEZ: Your hopes for season 2022?
    Hopefully I’ll have a full race programme, I didn’t ride my first race until July 3rd this year due to constraints imposed by the virus. When I had my big season in 2019 I came straight from a very good winter in the California sunshine and was in great shape to start winning straight off. Last year didn’t happen and whilst I got here in great condition this year the racing didn’t start until July so I didn’t have that big advantage I’d had for the start of my 2019 season. But I’ll be back here on 28th February 2022 and ready to race.

    PEZ: Final question, is Wout going to win the Worlds?
    I’d love to see that, WVA winning on home soil but I think he’ll be marked out of it. Colbrelli is my tip, he’s flying right now and not just winning sprints – his ride to win the Benelux Tour was quality.

    Eamon Lucas

    # Always a pleasure to chat to Eamon, we’ll get that beer with him one of these old days. #

    The post Eamon [van] Lucas Talks Belgium! appeared first on PezCycling News.


    Categories:PezCycling News

    WORLDS’21 Mixed Team Relay: Germany Tops!

    09/23/2021 0:02
    worlds21 mr

    Worlds Race Report: Germany is the new World champion in the Mixed Relay Team Time Trial. Over the 44.5 kilometre course, divided over 22.5 kilometres for the three men and 22 kilometres for the three women, the Germans were 12 seconds faster than the Netherlands. The bronze went to Italy.

    worlds21

    Today the field of participants was divided into three blocks. Of the first starting group, Poland was the fastest team, but their time of 54:12 was not nearly enough to even have a chance of a podium place. In the second group, the fight between Great Britain and Switzerland was especially interesting. The Swiss men were slightly faster, after which the women managed to increase the lead. A time of 51:26 was the new target time for the next countries.

    worlds21 mixed relay

    Successively Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands started in the last block. First the men raced from Knokke-Heist to Bruges (22.5km), while after the relay the women raced a loop of 22 kilometres around Bruges, arriving at ‘t Zand.

    worlds21mr

    Of those countries, Italy was by far the fastest. Filippo Ganna’s train clocked 24:18 (average 55.5km/h). Germany at the halfway point went through at 19 seconds, Denmark at 32 seconds and Belgium at 33 seconds. The Dutch men lost 42 seconds, a deficit that the women had to rectify.

    worlds21mr

    The Italian women had already lost the men’s lead at the intermediate point. Germany had the top time after 36.1 kilometres, but the Netherlands were 15 seconds and in second. Italy had dropped to third place.

    worlds21

    Lisa Brennauer, Lisa Klein and Mieke Kröger then set Germany’s finishing time at 50:49, 37 seconds faster than the provisional best time of Switzerland. Italy dived five hundredths of a second below the time of the Swiss and managed to pick up a medal.

    worlds21

    We had to wait for the Netherlands, where it was up to Ellen van Dijk, Annemiek van Vleuten and Riejanne Markus to beat Germany. However, that didn’t happen. At the finish, the difference between Germany and the Netherlands was 12 seconds, and so the Dutch lost the 2019 World title.

    worlds21mr

    It was a special day for Tony Martin. This Mixed Relay was the last race of his career for the four-time World time trial champion. Together with Max Walscheid, Nikias Arndt, Lisa Brennauer, Lisa Klein and Mieke Kröger, he picked up the gold in Bruges.

    worlds21mr

    The home team of Belgium had to settle for 7th place, 1:21 minutes behind the new World champions.

    worlds21

    World Championships 2021 Mixed Team Relay Result:
    1. Germany in 50:49

      Lisa Brennauer (Ger)
      Lisa Klein (Ger)
      Mieke Kroeger (Ger)
      Nikias Arndt (Ger)
      Tony Martin (Ger)
      Max Walscheid (Ger)

    2. Netherlands at 0:13

      Annemiek van Vleuten (Ned)
      Ellen van Dijk (Ned)
      Riejanne Markus (Ned)
      Koen Bouwman (Ned)
      Bauke Mollema (Ned)
      Jos van Emden (Ned)

    3. Italy at 0:38

      Marta Cavalli (Ita)
      Elena Cecchini (Ita)
      Elisa Longo Borghini (Ita)
      Edoardo Affini (Ita)
      Filippo Ganna (Ita)
      Matteo Sobrero (Ita)

    4. Switzerland at 0:38
    5. Great Britain at 0:55
    6. Denmark at 1:16
    7. Belgium at 1:21
    8. United States at 2:10
    9. France at 2:52
    10. Poland at 3:23

    The post WORLDS’21 Mixed Team Relay: Germany Tops! appeared first on PezCycling News.


    Categories:PezCycling News

    WORLDS’21 The PEZ Preview: Who Can Take the Rainbow?

    09/22/2021 12:02
    worlds20

    Worlds Road Race Preview: The biggest one-day race on the calendar, the World Championships are in Flanders this Sunday and has one of the strongest fields on a tough course of Flemish ramps. Ed Hood gives us his thought on the ‘Rainbow Race’.

    worlds20 alaphilippe
    Alaphilippe again?

    The official website tells us:
    After the start on the Grote Markt in Antwerp, the peloton leaves for Leuven, with a passage in Official Village Keerbergen. Arriving in Leuven, the final unfolds on the local circuit (4 hills) and the Flandrien circuit (6 hills):
    1.5 x local circuit Leuven,
    1 x Flandrien circuit
    4 x local circuit Leuven,
    1 x Flandrien circuit
    2.5 x local circuit Leuven.
    The finish line after this tough race is on the sloping Geldenaaksevest.
    Elevation: 2,562m
    Distance: 268.30km

    worlds21

    Got that? Me neither but in a word, CHALLENGING with some 40 climbs – and the TV producer will keep us right, we hope.

    But down to business, who’s gonna do the BUSINESS?

    We thought we’d wander through the start sheet by nation. . .

    Australia: has won the race once in the past thanks to Cadel Evans, this year they have to look to Michael Matthews, he’s twice stood on the Elite podium with bronze in Bergen 2017 and Richmond silver in 2015. He’s perhaps not as ultimately quick as he was but after a tough race like this one is going to be we can see him there or thereabouts – but not as a winner.

    tour21
    Matthews – Maybe not

    Belgium: is ‘Record Nation’ for the Professional/Elite Worlds with 26 wins, most recently with Philippe Gilbert in 2012. The parcours is made for a home, ‘Classicer’, BUT who? Wout Van Aert is one of our four ‘super favourites’ – with his silver medal in the Worlds Time Trial doing nothing to diminish that status – not forgetting his dominant Tour of Britain but Belgium’s perennial problem can be summed up in one word; ‘unity’.

    Wonder Boy and TT bronze medalist, Remco Evenepoel will strongly fancy his own chances and Jasper Stuyven didn’t win the Primavera because he’s not got a race like this in his legs. I’d love to be at the pre-race team briefing and study the facial expressions. And if you hear a journalist ask a rider if he’ll ride for so-and-so team mate and he replies; ‘the road will decide.’ That means; ‘No!’

    olympics
    It has to be Wout – Or does it?

    Denmark: has won the race but once, thanks to Mads Pedersen on a truly horrible day in Harrogate, England in 2019. And they have the same problem as Belgium, who’s the ‘Capo’? Pedersen can’t be ruled out; Magnus Cort is on fire – see the Vuelta stage results, Michael Valgren is back from the dead with back to back Italian semi-classic wins whilst E3 and Ronde winner Kasper Asgreen is a beast of a man. The Danish mentality is different to that of the Belgians and they should work as a team, but. . .

    vuelta21st12
    Magnus Cort is part of a strong Danish team

    France: is third in the nations ranking of Worlds wins on nine with cavalier defending champion, Julian Alaphilippe unlikely to surrender that maillot easily; he won the Flèche and was second at Liege so the repeated sharp climbs will hold few fears for him. However, should he stumble and over stretch himself then France’s ‘coming man’ is ‘Clark Kent doppelganger’, winning Plouay and Jura winner in recent weeks, Benoit Cosnefroy.

    tdf21st18
    Alaphilippe suited the rainbow hoops

    GB: has won this race twice thanks to the late, great Tom Simpson and the publicity magnet that is Mark Cavendish in Copenhagen in 2011. Cav rides again as part of a strong British team but will be in a team role on this parcours; small but sensational Olympic Mountain Bike Champion, Fleche Brabançonne winner and Amstel runner-up, Tom Pidcock looks to be their man. But will he be tired from his first Grand Tour in Spain or will that special physiology of his have ‘super compensated’ and he’ll fly? We’ll know on Sunday.

    olympics
    Tom Pidcock – Maybe peaked for the Olympics

    Germany: has also twice won the Worlds but you have to go all the way back to 1966 and the late Rudi Altig to find the last time they won. Max Schachmann is quality but their ‘Man’ is more likely to be big, recent Tour of Germany winner, Nils Politt who has stepped up a level this year and whose attacking style will be suited to the spikey profile.

    tdf21st12
    Nils Politt could be ‘the man’

    Italy: is second in the list of winners with 19 but Alessandro Ballan’s 2008 is slipping further and further away. However in Sonny Colbrelli we have our second, ‘super favourite’. I remember being at the Worlds in 2014 and Colbrelli was touted as a favourite but he lived up to his reputation of flopping on the big day. This year he’s different, he’s found that, ‘big ride temperament’ with Italian and European titles to his name. Caveats? That could be Matteo Trentin, devastated Worlds silver medallist in 2019 – however, the Squadra Azzuri generally rides as a cohesive unit, national pride does matter to the Italians.

    pantani
    Colbrelli – Italian ‘super favourite’

    The Netherlands: is fourth in the rankings with seven wins but it’s a long way back to ’85 and Joop Zoetemelk stealing away solo almost within sight of the line. This team does, however contain our third, ‘super favourite’ in the shape of tall and versatile Mathieu van der Poel, we thought that his hard landing in the Olympic Mountain Bike Race was the end of his season. However, the recent Antwerp Port Epic debunked that theory as the big Cyclo-cross World Champion looked to be back to near his best. Just remember to eat this time, Mathieu – not like at Harrogate ’19. . .

    tdf21st8
    MvdP – Is his back up to it?

    Portugal: has won the race with Rui Costa in 2013; a race still the subject of bar room debate – did Valverde stab compatriot Rodriguez in the back that day in Florence? João Almeida has to be considered on Sunday – he’s been strong all year with his dominant GC win in Poland the high point.

    giro21st19
    João Almeida – Strong all year

    Slovakia: has won this race three times on the bounce thanks to a certain Peter Sagan – and he’s back for 2021. His season was compromised by his crash in the Tour de France but two second places in Slovakia and the overall win recently, mean that you dismiss his chances at your peril.

    sagan
    Peter Sagan – World champion No.4?

    Slovenia: has never won the race with Andrej Hauptmann’s 2001 bronze as close as they’ve come. However, that could change as we nominate our fourth and final, ‘super favourite’ in the tall, lean shape of Tour de France winner, Tadej Pogačar.

    But there’s more!

    This nation of just 2.1 million souls also fields another two men who it come as no surprise if they won, Vuelta winner, Primoz Roglič and double Tour stage winner, Matej Mohorič who could become the first man to win the junior, u23 and elite world titles. And they don’t just have three of the race favourites, they have strong back up in the shape of men like Jan Tratnik and Luka Mezgec.

    tdf21st1
    Pogačar and Roglič – Which?

    Spain: has won the race on six occasions with ever green Alejandro Valverde defying Old Father just three years ago. The ‘Green Bullet’ doesn’t ride this year due to a broken collar bone and as far as Spain’s chances go, like the record company A&R men say; ‘I don’t hear a single’ but one for the future is INEOS’ Tour de l’Avenir winner, Carlos Rodriguez, we like the cut of his jib.

    sabatini
    Carlos Rodriguez – We like the cut of his jib

    Switzerland: has won the race three times, most recently in the shape of Oscar Camenzind in 1998. But in Marc Hirschi they have a man whose form is coming to the boil at just the right time – and don’t forget that he was third last year. And on the subject of Worlds bronze, European iTT Champion, Stefan Küng was third in the 2019 Harrogate horror.

    Hirschi Bauke Mollema
    Hirschi – Coming into form

    United States: Greg Lemond and Big Tex have given the USA three wins in the race and Olympic Road Race hero, Brandon McNulty is a man who should be in the mix.

    tdf10
    McNulty for USA

    One name?

    Wout.

    # ‘Worlds Race Report’ on Sunday and all the news in ‘EUROTRASH’ and the ‘BREAKDOWN’ on Monday. For live action go to SteepHillTV. #

    The post WORLDS’21 The PEZ Preview: Who Can Take the Rainbow? appeared first on PezCycling News.


    Categories:PezCycling News

    Roxo Racing Checks in From El Paso USA Crits

    09/22/2021 0:02
    roxo

    Follow the women of Roxo Racing, a Texas based women’s cycling team, in their first full year chasing national level races. Roxo has raced USA Crits events, Pro Nationals, and Joe Martin, both UCI professional events. The goal, shared by all, is to strive, learn and improve.

    Location: El Paso, Texas, Round 9 of the 2021 USA Crits series:

    roxo
    Living the rock star dream, Michelle (the mechanic) and Sanna the observer, share a hotel room, travel with and assemble their own bikes, make their own flight reservations and so on. We call it “bonding”, but this is normal in teams below the professional level.

    roxo
    Bikes together, almost everyone has arrived and they’re out to scout town, including the course they’ll race that evening. This is mid-morning, with an eye on a 7:00pm start of the women’s D1 Pro race.

    roxo
    After scouting the course and locale, our heroes (L to R) Michelle, Sanna and Jaime have zeroed in on the local coffee shop with a bike shop vibe. Check out the great memorabilia of Podium Finish, https://podiumfinishsportcafe.com/.

    roxo
    Boss man Tony, being a kind soul and treating our rock stars like… coffee swilling rock stars.

    roxo
    Ageing, grumpy DS author and bike rider Jaime shopping for supplies. These will come in handy in about 5 hours. Jaime’s an all-arounder. She acts as marketing liaison, IT person, navigator, bottle washer and she’s mother to two sons who want nothing to do with cycling. Oh, and she can climb, TT and ride crits if we insist. BTW, when Siri announces a phone call from Jaime, Siri pronounces the Spanish “Hy-mee”, so when you see her next…

    roxo
    Late afternoon and we’re headed to the course. We don’t have a team bus like Jumbo or EF. That’s a rental van with bikes and people packed in, including all-arounder Jaime, holding stuff steady in the back. We think she said “Hey, don’t get rear-ended”.

    roxo
    Michelle, who’s a New Yorker living in Denver, is now Denver Michelle. She’s normally stoic, measured, thoughtful, tactical, experienced, patient and we could go on. Oh, and goofy.

    roxo
    Three out of four, waiting for their race. Michelle looking toward the camera, Jaime to the left and smiley Tracy adjusting her glasses. Clear lenses are common as it will soon be dusk.

    roxo
    Our happy-go-lucky, pre-race clowns are doing their robot routine, although we hope to ban them from TikTok forever.

    roxo
    Meet Sanna, a Finnish scientist by profession, and a very strong bike rider. Sanna’s pleasant demeanor belies the fact that she’s quite nervous and wants to get going.

    roxo
    It’s show time, 7:00pm. In just a few minutes, pre-race nerves are washed away by focused concentration that lasts an hour, not to mention the physical discomfort of riding a bike in close quarters at 30mph.

    roxo
    Denver Michelle goes straight to work in the opening laps, as early primes keep the speed high.

    roxo
    It’s still early and Tracy, like everyone else in the bike race, is racing nose to tail, full gas. Soon the first break of the night will go, giving the chasing pack a short breather. Notice, Tracy’s normal smiley face is long gone.

    roxo
    El Paso is a very cool border city steeped in Hispanic culture, with many murals to share their story. This guy flexing his guns is a real person, Melchor Flores, fighting for answers, as his son was abducted by police in Mexico. Painted by El Mac, this mural is next to the Boxing Hall of Fame, while the fight for position in the bicycle race rages.

    roxo
    Michelle continues to lead the chase to limit the damage, as the Roxos missed the break. As soon as this break was pulled back another launched. That one turned out to be the winning move.

    roxo
    Notice the gear they are pushing. It’s a very quick pace as the break is soon to be in check. Meanwhile, due to the torrid pace, the riders at the back are suffering as the brutal selection continues.

    roxo
    Rats! The winning break has formed up ahead, as the laps wind down and nighttime falls. We burned matches we should’ve saved. Yet there are still placings up for grabs and two Roxos will place in the top 20, which are money paying spots.

    roxo
    Your author yelling stuff like “Venga! Venga!” or everybody’s favorite, “Move up!”. As if they can’t figure that out on their own.

    roxo
    It worked. Jaime went to the front and Frankie, that announcer guy who rode 9 Tours de France gave Roxo a shout out.

    roxo
    Elation under the streetlights. Another hard, competitive race on the books. The stories swapped right after the finish will continue for a while. Once things wind down and everyone gets cleaned up and changed, back at the hotel, we’ll debrief at dinner.

    roxo
    The job of any DS is to retain a razor-sharp focus, even under pressure, as seen here.

    Through the lens of our talented photog, Alex Roszko, we want to share our story.
    See more ROXO Racing at:
    https://www.roxoracing.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/roxoracing
    https://www.instagram.com/roxoracing/
    • Photos courtesy of Alex Roszko: https://www.instagram.com/roszko/?hl=en
    Alex Roszko on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/roszkophoto/
    • This article courtesy of ArundelBike.com – proud sponsor of ROXO Racing.

    The post Roxo Racing Checks in From El Paso USA Crits appeared first on PezCycling News.


    Categories:PezCycling News

    The 3 Day Strength Training Plan for Cyclists Over 50

    09/22/2021 0:02
    menachem

    With Labor day behind us and the clocks set to fall back an hour in the coming weeks, many cyclists are beginning to turn their focus to the weight room and strength training. Here are three things riders aged over 50 should consider to get stronger indoors.

    menachem

    With the cycling community doing an about-face over the last 5 years on the importance of strength training, many are looking to hit the weights hard and regularly, in an attempt to boost their strength over the next 3-5 months. Today we’re going to take a look at three changes riders aged over 50 years can, and should make in their approach, that go slightly against what’s popular, but will reward you with a stronger, more resilient, and happy body.

    Hitting the weights and performing resistance training offers us cyclists a bevy of returns:

    • Higher bone density
    • More lean muscle mass
    • The ability to handle more work

    While the evidence is mounting towards these benefits, the vast majority of the research is focused on those in the 20-30 age bracket, due in large part to who is available to participate in the research studies.

    For those over the age of 50, there are 3 major changes you’ll want to make, which will allow you to stack the deck in your favor, and give you a nice margin of safety, while betting heavily on strength training to help make you stronger on the bike.

    Don’t jump right into “lifting heavy stuff”
    While we do indeed need heavier weights to help reap all of the benefits strength training has to offer, especially after our 3rd decade on earth, our body has adapted to our postures & positions (both for better and worse) that have become a part of our habits. This means, for most of us, that we need some time to help get the muscles in their right working order, and joint positions.

    Thankfully, this can be done through bodyweight and band exercises over a 6-12 week period. Yes, I know, bodyweight exercises sound relatively easy, but when you focus on the technique and how you are performing the movement, it brings a whole new level of difficulty to the game. Add in some tempo work, and you have yourself a very challenging and potent recipe.

    But we must not be overzealous with our effort and time for these workouts, which brings us to #2.

    Do the least amount of work with strength, that gets you the results you want and need
    “Lazy, bordering on sloth”, as Charlie Munger puts it, comes to mind here. Perhaps lazy is too strong of a word, but it drives the point home well: You want to do the least amount of work to get you the results you want and need.

    Many of you reading this venture into strength training in the fall/winter, but often see it fall to the wayside during the spring and summer riding season. While this is the traditional model for strength training, it leaves those over the age of 35 at a much higher risk of injury when they do return to the weights.

    However, following rule #2 here, and heading to the gym for 2-3 strength workouts a week, consisting of 45-65 minutes of total time in the gym, can help you stay on track.

    This leads us to #3

    menachem

    The art of less is more

    We shouldn’t be hitting squats, and deadlifts, and lunges, and box jumps/plyometrics all on the same day- this will just kill you, pushing your body into a deep physiological hole.

    Rather, We want to touch on our 1-2 major exercises throughout these 2-3 workouts, and perform supporting exercises for the rest of the workout.

    So our strength training week would look something like this:

    Monday, Day 1

    A1. LIGHT plyometric, focused on quality, for a total of 15-20 “touches” (1 touch= 1 foot touching the floor 1x)

    A2. Hex Bar Deadlift off of 6 inch blocks 1*10 @ RPE 3, 2*10 @ RPE 6

    With the rest of the day consisting of 4-5 exercises that include 2 upper body exercises, and 2 global challenges (like an Isometric  suitcase hold, and a Half-kneeling adductor walkout)

    Thursday, Day 2

    A1. Goblet Squats– focused on technique and feeling the right muscles working

    for 3*8 for an RPE 6

    A2. Paloff Press for coordination of anti-rotation and full-body stability

    Saturday, Day 3

    Movement day, focused on building better core strength (Everything between your neck, elbows, and knees), as well as hitting muscles that tend to be tight/ out of working order for cyclists (i.e. chest, hip flexors, etc).

    Conclusion

    None of these 3 days should leave you feeling tired, sore, or worn out that day, or the next 2 days. But instead, you should leave the gym/strength training session feeling invigorated, energized, and better than you came in. Do this consistently for the next 10-12 weeks, and you’ll be off to a fantastic start for your riding season.

    If you’d like a program that’s been proven to help improve balance, strength, and the core competencies (and yes, your core as well) for better riding, you can purchase my 12 Week Core Training for Endurance Athletes Program, available on TrainingPeaks. Included is a 20+ page e-book to help you get the most out of your strength training, and a clickable PDF file for those who don’t want to rely on logging in to Training Peaks for their workouts.

    Use discount code “Pezisthebest” for a 15% discount, valid until September 30, 2021.

     

    The post The 3 Day Strength Training Plan for Cyclists Over 50 appeared first on PezCycling News.


    Categories:PezCycling News

    Strength Training for Cyclists 50+

    09/21/2021 12:02
    menachem

    With Labor day behind us and the clocks set to fall back an hour in the coming weeks, many cyclists are beginning to turn their focus to the weight room and strength training. What are three things those over 50 should consider?

    menachem

    With the cycling community doing an about-face over the last 5 years on the importance of strength training, many are looking to hit the weights hard and regularly, in an attempt to boost their strength over the next 3-5 months. Today we’re going to take a look at three changes those over 50 can, and should make in their approach, that go slightly against what’s popular, but will reward you with a stronger, more resilient, and happy body.

    Hitting the weights and performing resistance training offers us cyclists a bevy of returns:

    • Higher bone density
    • More lean muscle mass
    • The ability to handle more work

    While the evidence is mounting towards these benefits, the vast majority of the research is focused on those in the 20-30 age bracket, due in large part to who is available to participate in the research studies.

    For those over the age of 50, there are 3 major changes you’ll want to make, which will allow you to stack the deck in your favor, and give you a nice margin of safety, while betting heavily on strength training to help make you stronger on the bike.

    Don’t jump right into “lifting heavy stuff”
    While we do indeed need heavier weights to help reap all of the benefits strength training has to offer, especially after our 3rd decade on earth, our body has adapted to our postures & positions (both for better and worse) that have become a part of our habits. This means, for most of us, that we need some time to help get the muscles in their right working order, and joint positions.

    Thankfully, this can be done through bodyweight and band exercises over a 6-12 week period. Yes, I know, bodyweight exercises sound relatively easy, but when you focus on the technique and how you are performing the movement, it brings a whole new level of difficulty to the game. Add in some tempo work, and you have yourself a very challenging and potent recipe.

    But we must not be overzealous with our effort and time for these workouts, which brings us to #2.

    Do the least amount of work with strength, that gets you the results you want and need
    “Lazy, bordering on sloth”, as Charlie Munger puts it, comes to mind here. Perhaps lazy is too strong of a word, but it drives the point home well: You want to do the least amount of work to get you the results you want and need.

    Many of you reading this venture into strength training in the fall/winter, and often see it fall to the wayside during the spring and summer riding season. While this is the traditional model for strength training, it leaves those over the age of 35 at a much higher risk of injury when they do return to the weights.

    However, following rule #2 here, and heading to the gym for 2-3 strength workouts a week, consisting of 45-65 minutes of total time in the gym, can help you stay on track.

    This leads us to #3

    menachem

    The art of less is more

    We shouldn’t be hitting squats, and deadlifts, and lunges, and box jumps/plyometrics all on the same day- this will just kill you, pushing your body into a deep physiological hole.

    Rather, We want to touch on our 1-2 major exercises throughout these 2-3 workouts, and perform supporting exercises for the rest of the workout.

    So our strength training week would look something like this:

    Monday, Day 1

    A1. LIGHT plyometric, focused on quality, for a total of 15-20 “touches” (1 touch= 1 foot touching the floor 1x)

    A2. Hex Bar Deadlift off of 6 inch blocks 1*10 @ RPE 3, 2*10 @ RPE 6

    With the rest of the day consisting of 4-5 exercises that include 2 upper body exercises, and 2 global challenges (like an Isometric  suitcase hold, and a Half-kneeling adductor walkout)

    Thursday, Day 2

    A1. Goblet Squats– focused on technique and feeling the right muscles working

    for 3*8 for an RPE 6

    A2. Paloff Press for coordination of anti-rotation and full-body stability

    Saturday, Day 3

    Movement day, focused on building better core strength (Everything between your neck, elbows, and knees), as well as hitting muscles that tend to be tight/ out of working order for cyclists (i.e. chest, hip flexors, etc).

    Conclusion

    None of these 3 days should leave you feeling tired, sore, or worn out that day, or the next 2 days. But instead, you should leave the gym/strength training session feeling invigorated, energized, and better than you came in. Do this consistently for the next 10-12 weeks, and you’ll be off to a fantastic start for your riding season.

    If you’d like a program that’s been proven to help improve balance, strength, and the core competencies (and yes, your core as well) for better riding, you can purchase my 12 Week Core Training for Endurance Athletes Program, available on TrainingPeaks. Included is a 20+ page e-book to help you get the most out of your strength training, and a clickable PDF file for those who don’t want to rely on logging in to Training Peaks for their workouts.

    Use discount code “Pezisthebest” for a 15% discount, valid until September 30, 2021.

     

    The post Strength Training for Cyclists 50+ appeared first on PezCycling News.


    Categories:PezCycling News

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