Author Archive

No cases of COVID-19 detected in second round of rapid tests at Giro d’Italia

05/17/2021 0:02
Results of rest day PCR tests will be announced on Wednesday morning before stage 11

Categories:LIFE AS A HUMAN

Ciccone changes from attacker to contender at Giro d’Italia

05/17/2021 0:02
‘Bernal was on another level today’ says Italian after second place at Campo Felice

Categories:LIFE AS A HUMAN

FIRST LOOK: SALSA’S GRAVEL BIKE ANSWER FOR KIDS

05/17/2021 0:02

Press Release

Today we welcome Journeyman 24 to our lineup. As you might have guessed, this new adventure machine applies Journeyman’s versatile all-road formula to a smaller frame with 24″ wheels.

We believe that everybody should be able to bask in the freedom of a gravel ride or discover the art of self-sufficiency on a bike packing outing. Journeyman 24 makes those experiences accessible to young riders or those who aren’t currently served by the sizes offered on Journeyman 700c or 650b.

Journeyman 24’s aluminum frame has a 455 mm effective top tube length and 350 mm seat tube length to suit smaller riders. But we did more than just shrink everything. Our engineering team refined Journeyman 24’s geometry for the smaller wheel size to maintain stability and handling on a wide range of road surfaces.

Journeyman 24 may be smaller, but it’s well-equipped for dream rides:
* A reliable 1 x 9 drivetrain with a clutch derailleur to keep the wheels turning down any road you point them
24 x 1.85″ tires for the traction and cushion to take on mixed-terrain rides.
* Room for a 24 oz water bottle in the frame triangle, plus a mount on the underside of the downtube designed for use with our Anything Bracket Mini.
* Three-Pack mounts on the fork legs for hauling extra food, water, or everything you need for a night under the stars.
* Rear rack mounts for added carrying capacity

Whether you’re looking for a way to include your whole family on your all-road adventure rides, or you’re seeking your own do-it-all gravel bike in a smaller size, Journeyman 24 makes mixed-surface riding more accessible.

PRICE: $899
For More: Salsa Cycles

The post FIRST LOOK: SALSA’S GRAVEL BIKE ANSWER FOR KIDS appeared first on Road Bike Action.


Categories:Road Bike Action

GIRO D’ITALIA STAGE 10 COURSE PREVIEW

05/17/2021 0:02

A short, rolling stage with a pan-flat finale. The route first takes in climbs up to Sella di Corno and Forca di Arrone, and then tackles one last ascent up to Valico della Somma (awarding KOM points). The route eventually levels out in the final part, running on broad and mostly straight roads. As the stage passes through several urban areas, roundabouts, traffic islands and street furniture will be found along the route.

Finale

The final is quite straight, up to 2000m to the finish. Here the route features a right-hand bend, immediately followed by two left-hand bends that lead to the home stretch (at 1,300 m out), with just a slight half-turn 500m before the finish line, on tarmac road.

TOP 5 STAGE WINNER FAVORITES

  • Diego Ulissi
  • Bauke Mollema
  • Jan Tratnik
  • Peter Sagan
  • Tim Merlier

MORE RACING NEWS

 

GIRO/RBA

The post GIRO D’ITALIA STAGE 10 COURSE PREVIEW appeared first on Road Bike Action.


Categories:Road Bike Action

THE CAUSE OF A CRASH – FAKE NEWS WHEN VIDEO PUNDITS GUESS WRONG

05/17/2021 0:02

Ah yes, the wishy-washy opinion of another arm chair racing/technology expert…this time in the analysis of  Matej Mohoric’s frightening  Stage 9 crash at the Giro d’ Italia. Here we have “Pedaler” dissecting  the high-speed endo first with an admission that he doesn’t “want to be that guy to say his disc brakes locked up”  before going on  – and without any definitive proof – concluding that the crash was the fault of the Merida rider’s disc brakes.

What we find so  irresponsible about Pedaler’s guess is that it comes based on his assertion that “We know disc brakes on road bikes during a descent can overheat, seize and lock-up.”  Really?!  Is that opinion or fact? Who is the “we” that he refers to?

“I think, I’m not sure…but in my opinion I would have to go with the fact that his front caliper seized.”  

Over the course of the last decade, Road Bike Action  has probably ridden and tested more disc brake equipped road bikes than anyone. We’ve ridden disc brakes from every maker and in every type of conditions.  And,  while like any brake they too can  get over-heated that brings with it some added rubbing, we have NEVER encountered any disc brake that seized or locked up – as in NEVER!

 

Further, after Pedaler says he doesn’t “want to be that guy” who indicts disc brakes as the cause of the crash (before doing just that) he goes on to claim that just maybe “it could’ve been a fork failure.”  Or a  crack in the pavement (as has been reported in the race report below).  Or?!

“Matej Mohoric, one of the men credited with pioneering cycling’s now banned aerodynamic supertuck position, survived a horrific high speed downhill crash at the Giro d’Italia on Sunday.

The 26-year-old Slovenian was in his saddle when he hit a crack in the road on stage nine of the Giro, snapping his bike in two and landing on his head after a midair summersault.

Mohoric wanted to continue but was taken away in a neck brace. “He has been taken to the hospital by ambulance for radiological diagnostics,” said his team Bahrain Victorious in a statement.”

But perhaps our favorite part of this misleading video in when “Pedaler” posits yet another back-and-forth opinion….

“That doesn’t look like he overcooked the corner, then again, he might’ve overcooked the corner a little bit!”

 

THE BOTTOM LINE?

As we all know, the  world of road cyclists is rife with arm chair racers and engineers who feel emboldened to opine on topics of which they have no real experience. On any given group ride you can hear riders with no race experience second-guessing the performance of  everyone from pro peloton pack fodder to Tour de France champions. Part of the appeal of the sport really.

And although it was five years ago, we still well remember all the hysterical hoopla that was raised by so many disc brake detractors following Fran Ventoso’s accusation that a disc brake rotor gashed his knee in a crash which led to the UCI backtracking on disc brakes being allowed in the pro peloton.  This is the problem with unproven opinion taken as fact.

Yes, there were definitely some early teething problems when disc brakes jumped to road bikes. But over the years, the systems have  evolved and we have only seen marked improvements in their design and performance.  And as we all know, there are now more pro teams using disc brakes than teams that are not which surely must act as some measure of confidence in their performance. Sure, while anything can happen and anything can break, it makes to sense to assert as fact such an alarming accusation, what in reality, is just uninformed opinion.

Caleb Ewan taking his second stage victory at the 2021 Giro with trouble-free disc brakes. Photo: Bettini

We’re sure Pedaler means well his with video, and we appreciate his warning to cyclists about staying safe, but all of his self-contradictory messaging just comes across as careless and inflammatory.  We can assure that disc brakes are only going to get more predominant on road bikes, so the less misinformation that can be spread about them the better.

The fear factor of new technology has no merit in denying the improved braking performance provided by disc brakes.

Top Photo: Bettini

The post THE CAUSE OF A CRASH – FAKE NEWS WHEN VIDEO PUNDITS GUESS WRONG appeared first on Road Bike Action.


Categories:Road Bike Action

GIRO D’ITALIA STAGE 9 HIGHLIGHTS

05/17/2021 0:02

Colombia’s Egan Bernal soared into the Giro d’Italia overall lead on Sunday when he accelerated away from his key rivals to win stage nine’s mountaintop showdown. The Ineos leader and winner of the 2019 Tour de France pulled away from a select group on a gravel ski slope above the clouds with the other overall contenders only able to watch as he skipped away.

Giulio Ciccone was second at 7 seconds back and Alexandr Vlasov was third at the same time as Remco Evenepoel and Dan Martin ended 10 seconds back and Romain Bardet at 12. Britain’s Simon Yates again lost a handful of seconds but there are 12 tough stages remaining.

The 24-year-old Bernal had been suffering back problems that forced him out of last year’s Tour and limited his competition time since.

“I sacrificed so much to be here,” an emotional Bernal said at the line.

“I can’t tell you just how happy I am to be here talking to you now.”

Italy’s Gianni Moscon guided Bernal up the final steep slope beyond the treeline to its highest altitude so far with 9 percent average gradient with sections at 12 percent.

“I hadn’t been planning to win the stage, but my teammates were encouraging me to go for it,” said Bernal, who produced his exhilarating attack 600 meters from home as the finale was contested ‘off piste’, on a gravel track used as a ski slope in winter.

MORE RACING NEWS

FINALE

POST-RACE INTERVIEWS

RBA/AFP Photo: Bettini

The post GIRO D’ITALIA STAGE 9 HIGHLIGHTS appeared first on Road Bike Action.


Categories:Road Bike Action

GIRO D’ITALIA STAGE 9 RESULTS AND PHOTO GALLERY

05/17/2021 0:02

Colombia’s Egan Bernal soared into the Giro d’Italia overall lead on Sunday when he accelerated away from his key rivals to win stage nine’s mountaintop showdown. The Ineos leader, and winner of the 2019 Tour de France, pulled away from a select group on a gravel ski slope above the clouds with the other overall contenders only able to watch as he skipped away.

Remarkably this was Bernal’s first stage win on a Grand Tour, impressive in the manner of its execution and setting. Giulio Ciccone was second on the day at 7sec and Alexandr Vlasov was third in the same time. Remco Evenepoel and Dan Martin came in 10 seconds back and Romain Bardet also clung on at 12 seconds. Britain’s Simon Yates again lost a handful of seconds but there are still 12 tough stages remaining. The 24-year-old Bernal had been suffering back problems that forced him out of last year’s Tour de France and limited his competition time since.

“I sacrificed so much to be here,” an emotional Bernal said at the line.

“I can’t tell you just how happy I am to be here talking to you now.”

Italian Gianni Moscon guided Bernal up the final steep slope beyond the treeline to its highest altitude so far with 9 percent average gradient with sections at 12 percent.

“I hadn’t been planning to win the stage, but my teammates were encouraging me to go for it,” said Bernal, who produced his exhilarating attack 600 meters from home in a finale contested ‘off piste’, on a gravel track used as a ski slope in winter.












Campo Felice

The Campo Felice terrain possibly suited the man from the Andes, who learned his trade on mountain bikes and is a renowned bike handler.

Evenepoel said ahead of the race “everyone is looking forward to the last climb” but the Belgian rookie was forced to dig deep when Ineos set a blistering pace as the race climbed through the clouds. With predictions the 21-year-old Belgian would take the pink jersey fromHungary’s Attila Valter it was instead Bernal’s brilliant burst that provided the day’s fireworks. He leads Evenepoel by just 15 seconds, with Vlasov third at 21 seconds and the entire top ten separated by 61 seconds.

Sunday’s stage featured a spectacular crash on the descent of the Passo Godi at the 35km mark when Matej Mohoric hit a crack in the road, snapping his bike in two and landing on his head after a midair somersault. The Slovenian, who was one of the pioneers of the now banned downhill ‘supertuck’ position, remained conscious but was taken to hospital for x-rays and kept under observation.

Earlier Sunday the peloton was given a Covid-19 all clear with no positive tests amongst the riders or staff on the 23 teams.

However one cyclist Tomasz Marczynski of the Belgian Lotto-Soudal team was withdrawn as a precaution because of symptoms related to the deadly virus.

GIRO D’ITALIA STAGE 9 RESULTS

1  BERNAL Egan INEOS Grenadiers 4:08:23
2  CICCONE Giulio Trek – Segafredo 0:07
3  VLASOV Aleksandr Astana – Premier Tech 0:07
4  EVENEPOEL Remco Deceuninck – Quick Step 0:10
5  MARTIN Dan Israel Start-Up Nation 0:10
6  CARUSO Damiano Bahrain – Victorious 0:12
7  BARDET Romain Team DSM 0:12
8  SOLER Marc Movistar Team 0:12
9  MARTÍNEZ Daniel Felipe INEOS Grenadiers 0:12
10  ALMEIDA João Deceuninck – Quick Step 0:12


OVERALL STANDINGS

1  BERNAL Egan INEOS Grenadiers 35:19:22
2  EVENEPOEL Remco Deceuninck – Quick Step 0:15
3  VLASOV Aleksandr Astana – Premier Tech 0:21
4  CICCONE Giulio Trek – Segafredo 0:36
5  VALTER Attila Groupama – FDJ 0:43
6  CARTHY Hugh EF Education – Nippo 0:44
7  CARUSO Damiano Bahrain – Victorious 0:45
8  MARTIN Dan Israel Start-Up Nation 0:51
9  YATES Simon Team BikeExchange 0:55
10  FORMOLO Davide UAE-Team Emirates 1:01


RBA/AFP Photos: Bettini

The post GIRO D’ITALIA STAGE 9 RESULTS AND PHOTO GALLERY appeared first on Road Bike Action.


Categories:Road Bike Action

PEZ Bookshelf: The Cycling Chef

05/16/2021 12:04
chef

There have been so many advances not only in the technology of cycling and in our understanding of training approaches and the key benefits of recovery, but also in the importance of nutrition. In the Good Old Days racing cyclists downed raw eggs and Chianti, with lots of steak on the side. Today pro teams employ their own chefs and there are valuable resources available to any interested amateur on how to eat well for better performance. “The Cycling Chef” by Michelin-starred chef Alan Murchison, released in March of this year, is a valuable addition to this literature.

chef

One of life’s great pleasures is the enjoyment of good food and it is disturbing to me, with deep family ties to gastronomic traditions, that the idea of “food as fuel” has such wide currency. So it was with some concern that I noticed “The Cycling Chef” title includes “Recipes for Getting Lean and Fuelling the Machine.” When thinking of fuel, I have in my mind the depressing image of those truly abominable carbohydrate bars that triathletes would peel the wrapper off of and then stick to their top tubes while racing. However, Mr. Murchison (or his editors) are just toying with us: the author really can cook–”fuelling” is a disservice to what is on offer here.

We have reviewed a number of books here written by food scientists and nutrition experts but this might be the first one written by a chef, someone with experience in matching the kind of ingredients that not only meet an athletic need but are tasty and attractive. This book is actually a sequel to “The Cycling Chef: Recipes for Pleasure and Performance.” Furthermore, Mr. Murchison has an unusual perspective in that not only does he have more than 25 years’ experience in top restaurants, he is himself a dedicated endurance athlete, and as a Masters participant has won multiple European and World titles in duathlon. Focused now on time trialling, he is also one of the principals of The Performance Chef, offering consulting services on nutrition, including menu planning and race preparation.

chef

“The Cycling Chef” is organized quite differently from traditional cookbooks—that is, appetizers then soups, main courses, side dishes, desserts, etc. Rather, the book is arranged around the kind of calendar that an athlete looking to peak for an event would follow. There is food for the off-season, pre-season, and racing times, and the different requirements are explained. For example, after having all that comfort food in the off-season, the pre-season is “lower carbs for body composition and getting back on track.” Pre-race food: “easy-to-digest, high-energy and high-carb.” There is sound advice here about weight loss and power output. The author recoils at the idea of fad diets—all of them work (to some extent) for the same reason, which is calorie deprivation—as none of them are devised for endurance athletes. His tips for losing weight are simple enough: exercise portion control; understand the Glycemic Index; using sugar judicially while riding; get enough protein; go crazy for vegetables.

chef

The recipes, many of which are accompanied with excellent(and appetizing) colour photos, are interesting and creative. Along with classics, like DIY muesli or minestrone, there are intriguing things like “Old-school chicken, apricot and pomegranate pilaf.” Here in the Pez Test Kitchen, the recipes we sampled were hits, including “Nutty carrot slaw with edamame beans,” and “Creamy baked leeks with blue cheese and walnuts.” For the most part, the ingredients are not difficult to obtain and even someone with limited cooking skills would be able to produce a good result. The instructions are clear and generally don’t have more than five or six steps. You could certainly impress a dinner guest with “Baked ginger and sesame sea bream “en papilolote””!

chef

For those interested in plant-based diets, the author is not an enthusiast, writing: “My view is that there is currently no solid, well-researched and credible evidence to prove that a plant-based diet makes you a better athlete.” While he points out that the 2019 World Time Trial champions eat balanced diets with meat, he suggests that if there were performance improvements without it they would surely consider that. Of course, this highly selective comment overlook athletes like the UK’s own Lizzie Armistead, a longtime vegetarian, or Dave Zabriskie, a vegan who was the third American to wear the yellow jersey at the Tour de France. The author might just as well have noted that there is no well-researched and credible evidence to prove that a plant-based diet is harmful to athletic performance either, while there are indisputable benefits to general health. Nonetheless, he does argue for increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables, and in fact many of the recipes in the book would be vegetarian-friendly. (Michelin-honoured chefs have a predisposition to use all available ingredients in their cooking, I suspect. Of the 2,651 Michelin-starred restaurants in the world, only seven are vegetarian and a single one vegan.)

chef

Although we tried out the recipes at random because they looked interesting, this book will be most rewarding to an endurance athlete in training, looking for some structure in their diet. This is shown not only by the organization of the book, but also by the impressively detailed sample meal planner found on pages 184-185. There are examples for three meals plus snacks and pre-bed food for five different days: Rest Day; Easy Training Day; Medium Training Day; Pre-Race Day; and Hard Ride or Race. This is the kind of detail we have never seen in any nutrition books reviewed previously here.

chef

“The Cycling Chef: Recipes for Getting Lean and Fuelling the Machine” is nicely produced, not only with illustrations of the food but also great black-and-white photos from Cycling’s Golden Age. We have come a long way from raw eggs and beef tartare as cyclist diet fundamentals (although the Chianti is still welcome to some of us) and this book provides clear explanations of how food can help us while not overlooking the joys of cooking and of eating.

chef

“The Cycling Chef: Recipes for Getting Lean and Fuelling the Machine” by Alan Murchison
192 pp., illus., hardcover
Bloomsbury Sport, London, 2021
ISBN 978-1-4729-7864-6
Suggested price: US$34/C$46/GBP 22
Photos are from the book.

chef

# The Cycling Chef: Recipes for Getting Lean and Fuelling the Machine is available from AMAZON.COM HERE. #

The post PEZ Bookshelf: The Cycling Chef appeared first on PezCycling News.


Categories:PezCycling News

Mohoric out of Giro d’Italia as bike snaps in horrific downhill crash

05/16/2021 12:03
Slovenian leaves the race in neck brace

Categories:LIFE AS A HUMAN

Anna van der Breggen wins GP Ciudad de Eibar

05/16/2021 12:03
Van Vleuten second, Longo Borghini third

Categories:LIFE AS A HUMAN

RSS
Follow by Email